January 5, 2014

World Cup Referees - Predictions for South America

Having already yielded predictions of probable World Cup referees from three zones (AFC, CAF and CONCACAF), I would like to closely scrutinize the hosting confederation's situation. The South American federation CONMEBOL has steadily played an essential role with regard to football refereeing, specially in the current millennium, if we remember referees and their quality like Horacio Elizondo or Jorge Larrionda. Therefore, selecting seven profiled and excellent referees must be one of Massimo Busacca's main interests when forming Team No.33, keeping in mind South American officials have always been valid candidates for the final. But, as you will see, this time's pre-list referees are completely different than in the past years caused by a radical generation change because of the retirement of many referees we were used to see in the past.

Which South American referees will enjoy their World Cup this time?
We cannot be sure about the exact number of officials coming from the three zones already analyzed. But what we know with certainty according to several reports in the media is that CONMEBOL will get a referee more than in 2010, meaning that this analysis will assume 6+1 referees from South America. Before starting the analysis, I must pay great tribute to our co-bloggers of Árbitro Internacional, who don't only provide us with the latest referee appointments at FIFA tournaments, but who also shaped my opinion on the match officials from South America. Of course, the post will however be also based on our observations gathered during the last FIFA competitions and World Cup qualifiers.


REFEREE with ASSISTANT REFEREES
MA
Date of Birth
FIFA 10-13
Vote
SOUTH AMERICA (CONMEBOL) – 10 NATIONS
Referee
Diego ABAL
ARG
28.12.1971
5
57%
Standby Ref
Néstor PITANA
ARG
17.06.1975
7
38%
Assistant 1
Hernán MAIDANA
ARG
14.02.1972
11

Assistant 2
Juan Pablo BELATTI
ARG
15.04.1979
7

Standby AR
Diego BONFÁ
ARG
04.12.1977
8

Referee
Raúl OROSCO
BOL
25.03.1979
4
29%
Assistant 1
Efraín CASTRO
BOL
26.11.1969
4

Assistant 2
Arol VALDA
BOL
10.12.1970
3

Referee
Sandro RICCI
BRA
19.11.1974
10
90%
Standby Ref
Heber LOPES
BRA
13.07.1972
8
26%
Assistant 1
Alessandro ROCHA DE MATOS
BRA
10.02.1976
18

Assistant 2
Emerson DE CARVALHO
BRA
24.06.1972
18

Standby AR
Marcelo VAN GASSE
BRA
09.03.1976
10

Referee
Enrique OSSES
CHI
26.05.1974
7
89%
Assistant 1
Carlos Alexis ASTROZA
CHI
23.11.1976
6

Assistant 2
Sergio ROMÁN
CHI
11.02.1969
3

Referee
Wilmar ROLDÁN
COL
24.01.1980
7
89%
Assistant 1
Humberto CLAVIJO
COL
18.08.1973
9

Assistant 2
Eduardo DIAZ
COL
10.07.1973
7

Referee
Carlos VERA
ECU
25.06.1976
8
72%
Assistant 1
Christian LESCANO
ECU
07.06.1983
14

Assistant 2
Byron ROMERO
ECU
12.07.1980
7

Referee
Antonio ARIAS
PAR
07.09.1972
11
71%
Assistant 1
Rodney AQUINO
PAR
16.04.1984
6

Assistant 2
Carlos CACÈRES
PAR
26.06.1983
9

Referee
Víctor CARRILLO
PER
30.10.1975
11
65%
Assistant 1
Jonny BOSSIO
PER
31.07.1975
13

Assistant 2
César ESCANO
PER
08.02.1970
10

Referee
Martin VAZQUEZ
URU
14.01.1969
1
45%
Assistant 1
Nicolas TARÁN
URU
27.08.1980
1

Assistant 2
Miguel NIEVAS
URU
16.12.1974
2

Referee
Juan SOTO
VEN
14.10.1977
4
29%
Assistant 1
Jorge URREGO
VEN
09.10.1981
5

Assistant 2
Carlos LÓPEZ
VEN
22.06.1982
5



Let us start leisurely. Brazil will host the World Cup so that they definitely need a high-quality referee trio. The past has shown that this football nation has produced many top referees such as Arnaldo Coelho, José Wright or Carlos Simon. However, this time, it was not that easy at all to find a reliable and above all fit referee who can fulfill this venerable task in his home nation. At first, Wilson Seneme was planned to represent Brazilian refereeing at the World Cup. He showed to be a very self-confident and good referee at U-20 World Cup 2011. Unfortunately, he was persecuted by bad luck and failed some fitness tests due to injuries. After some incertainty, Sandro Ricci has turned out to be the one on whom all trust is put. FIFA also focused on Heber Lopes for a while and even invited him to plenty of seminars and U-17 World Cup 2013, but in the end the recent Club World Cup final has shown who is the clear no.1. He has shown an impressive development this year, without any doubt. But it must be emphasized that Ricci's first international match was in 2011. So he is only in his fourth really international year and is already pushed to a World Cup. That's not only impressive, but also risky. Although I am sure that Ricci will do well at his home World Cup, I cannot fully understand how a referee department that knows that their nation will host the World Cup since 2007, does not manage to establish a fit, experienced and good referee in these almost seven years. It was surely bad luck that Seneme was not an option anymore after his injuries, but if plan B is a referee who is internationally active since 2011, something went wrong.
Ricci's assistant referees should not remain unmentioned either. Alessandro Rocha De Matos and Emerson De Carvalho have proven their skills in plenty of FIFA organized tournaments and are a real advantage of this trio. At U-17 World Cup 2013 and Club World Cup 2013, Marcelo van Gasse assisted Ricci as AR2 though. I don't really understand why FIFA has done this move, but maybe the jury is still out to decide about these three assistant referees.

Like in Europe, there are some nations in South America that are always represented by one of their referees at the World Cup. This counts for Brazil and it does so for Argentina as well. Similar to Brazil, there are two match officials who attended FIFA tournaments in recent months because of being short-listed for the World Cup: Diego Abal and Néstor Pitana.
Abal first appeared at U-17 World Cup 2011 and only refereed two matches there, as his assistant referees had failed the fitness tests prior to the competition. The overall impression was quite promising. The 1971 born referee however faced some hard months in 2012. In a crucial and highly combatted match in the Argentine league, he overruled or at least ignored an offside flag of his AR. All the defenders relied on this flag, while the attacking team were clever enough to score a goal allowed by Abal (compliant with the old offside rule, the AR correctly raised the flag). For this reason, Abal and his family received multiple death threats by furious fans of San Lorenzo. They were under police protection as a consequence. Things like that don't leave anybody cold, of course. He only handled six Copa Libertadores matches in the past three seasons (as a comparison, most of the other pre-list officials refereed between 5 and 9 matches per season at the same time). Nonetheless, he seems to be protected by some people inside FIFA so that he was appointed to attend Confederations Cup 2013. In his only match, Italy vs Japan, he performed quite poorly to be honest. In the months after that, he was among others unable to handle a World Cup qualifier he was appointed for because of a failed fitness test in Argentina. In my opinion, this is way too much trouble around a possible World Cup referee. 
FIFA additionally increased the pressure on Abal by including a second referee from Argentina on the current pre-list. Néstor Pitana showed clearly better performances in the World Cup qualifiers and at U-17 World Cup 2013. His fitness is not a problem contrary to Abal. Arguing with common sense, Busacca should actually select him. But who knows. It is difficult to say but I predict that Busacca and the committee collect their wits just for once. A smooth solution would be to classify the Argentine representative as standby official at any rate, regardless whether it will be Abal or Pitana. However, this is contradictory in itself - Argentina will have a main referee, I am quite sure.

Colombian Wilmar Roldán is next whom I personally consider as the currently best South American referee, despite the fact that he is the youngest of all pre-selected referees. His style is quite exceptional from my point of view, as he combines the necessary determination with a lenient approach, at least considering his international FIFA performances. 
The Olympic Games 2012 have shown the great potential of this match official. In 2012 and 2013, he moreover took charge of the Copa Libertadores finals in a good manner. There is no doubt that this referee does not have to fear anything; he is surely at the World Cup. The circumstance that he only handled two minor group stage matches at U-20 World Cup 2013 might contradict this thesis. But actually this competition was only a small casting show where every referee got a fixed amount of matches (at least 2) regardless how they performed in their first match. Consequently, not appearing in the k.o. stage could be also a positive sign indicating that Busacca is absolutely convinced of him and did not see the need to test him once again (keeping in mind that every match can potentially create mistakes that might spoil the World Cup...). Along with Humberto Clavijo, who was already present at World Cup 2010, and Eduardo Díaz, Roldán will form one of the strongest referee trios outside UEFA in my opinion.

Besides Roldán, Chile's Enrique Osses has been the South American referee over the last years. He refereed multiple Libertadores matches including the first leg of 2012 final (Roldán handled the second leg). But this was not his only final. In 2012 and 2013, he handled both finals of Copa Sudamericana which one can easily compare to UEFA Europa League. Osses only attended two FIFA tournaments - first the Club World Cup 2011, where he took control over a quarterfinal, and second last year's Confederations Cup where he conveyed an ambivalent impression about his referee abilities. His first performance in the group stage encounter of Mexico and Italy was below expected level, as he showed remarkable shortcomings in his match control. In the semifinal between Brazil and Uruguay though, he performed very well and removed several doubts that arised from his first performance. Along with Ricci and Roldán, Osses will very likely be the South American referee who gets some really tough and important matches at the World Cup - of course, all depends on the first performance, but this is what I would predict just now.
The only question concerning him is who will accompany him. At the Confed Cup, Francisco Mondria was absent due to injury. Sergio Román replaced him. Very likely, Francisco Mondria and Carlos Astroza will be Osses' assistant referees at the World Cup as long as both are fit and health.

In the previous texts, I have often touched on the aspect of political interference in the selection done by the referee committee and the Suisse chief officer. CONMEBOL's head of refereeing Carlos Alarcón of Paraguay is in FIFA's Referee Committee as well. I would be surprised if his influence is not strong enough to make a Paraguayan referee team join the World Cup. In 2010, Carlos Amarilla was planned to attend the World Cup inspite of poor shape and performances. He only missed the tournament as his assistant referees failed the fitness tests. This time, Paraguay has a good and reliable referee called Antonio Arias. Within CONMEBOL, Arias did not get the biggest matches during the last seasons but at least refereed Copa Sudamericana's final in 2012. He is therefore not belonging to the absolute peak of South American refereeing, but one step below it. His World Cup qualifiers were however quite important. The 41-year-old was invited to the last two editions of FIFA U-20 World Cup. In 2011, he took charge of five matches including a round of 16 match and the 3rd place match between Mexico and France. In 2013, he only got two matches in the group stage which is normal due to the high amount of officials appointed to handle matches in Turkey. Both performances were good. So I guess Arias is another sure name to appear on the final list. Maybe he is not the strongest South American referee, but he has the abilities and political background needed to qualify for the World Cup.

After mentioning five referees whom I consider as sure names for the World Cup, it is time to highlight three officials without a chance to be nominated for the final tournament.

Equivalent to the problems in Brazil, the situation in Uruguay was and still is quite complicated. At first, Dario Ubriaco and Roberto Silvera were pre-selected. Ubriaco indeed showed a good U-20 tournament in 2011. But like some of their colleagues in other nations, both officials had fitness problems arousing from injuries. For example, Silvera failed a fitness test in Zurich in 2012 and rejected to try it again some weeks later in South America. After Larrionda, both referees were probably the best Uruguayan officials and both had a large international experience. In 2013, Silvera even handled a Copa Libertadores semifinal and one leg of the Copa Sudamericana final. But he won't be at the World Cup, which is a pity.
Instead, the only remaining Uruguayan on the pre-list is Martin Vazquez, who filled Amarilla's place at World Cup 2010 and accompanied many officials as fourth official (for example Larrionda in Germany vs England). Since Larrionda is also in the referee committee today, there maybe was a chance for Vazquez to get his ticket to Brazil. But, as you can guess, Vazquez had bad luck as well and suffered from an injury prior to U-17 World Cup 2013 for which he was selected. He only refereed one FIFA match in the whole pre-list period. As a result, the likelihood that Uruguay will stay without a World Cup referee is very high.

Venezuela's Juan Soto has only very small outsider chances, too. He showed a couple of poor performances during the last years, such as in his only (!) qualifier between Ecuador and Bolivia, where he awarded a phantom penalty kick. Back in 2012, he was pretty much under fire in the Olympic Games match between Spain and Honduras. He broke Olympic records by issuing 13 yellow cards, had no control at all and was attacked and dissented by various players without reacting to it as it should be. Even though it might be hard, but this evening in Newcastle could have disqualified him. Some matches at U-17 World Cup 2013 won't change that.

The South American pre-list pays much attention to have one referee from each of the confederation's ten member states. For this reason, there is also a Bolivian trio headed by Raúl Orosco. In a nutshell: apart from a surprising semifinal appointment at the last Copa America, this referee does not have many arguments. He only got one match at the Olympic Games and showed no good performance. Orosco only got one World Cup qualifier in 2011 and nothing else since then. Within CONMEBOL, he is not frequently appointed either. Without any doubt, the young and maybe talented referee from Bolivia has no chance.

By this method of elimination, there are only two remaining places and two referees left. Ecuadorian Carlos Vera and Peruvian Víctor Carrillo will very likely "fight" for the last place as a main referee. Vera performed very well at Club World Cup 2012 and took charge of Chelsea FC's semifinal against Monterrey there. At U-20 World Cup 2013, he only took charge of two group stage matches and showed one very good and one satisfying performance respectively. His assistant referees Christian Lescano and Byron Romero (not to be confused with Byron Moreno..) both are very young but very good and have often proven their eagle eyes. 

Carrillo was invited to three FIFA tournaments since 2010 including a U-17 World Cup and a U-20 World Cup. Even though the performances were at least acceptable and solid, this referee's style caught my attention. I rarely saw a referee who looks grimly for the entire 90 minutes, but Carrillo did so in many matches. He appears quite unfriendly and definitely more pedantic than Vera - at least based on the FIFA matches. But, as mentioned, he is a solid referee. By the way, he was the only referee who took charge of five World Cup qualifiers - the highest number of all pre-list referees.
Summarizing these words, I predict Carlos Vera as the sixth South American who will act on the field of play, while I expect Víctor Carrillo as the standby official from the hosting confederation CONMEBOL.

All in all, I predict these South American World Cup referees:

REFEREE with ASSISTANT REFEREES
MA
Date of Birth
CONMEBOL – 6 REFEREE TEAMS + 1 STANDBY TEAM
Referee
Néstor PITANA
ARG
17.06.1975
Assistant 1
Hernán MAIDANA
ARG
14.02.1972
Assistant 2
Juan Pablo BELATTI
ARG
15.04.1979
Referee
Sandro RICCI
BRA
28.09.1970
Assistant 1
Alessandro ROCHA DE MATOS
BRA
10.02.1976
Assistant 2
Emerson DE CARVALHO
BRA
24.06.1972
Referee
Enrique OSSES
CHI
26.05.1974
Assistant 1
Carlos Alexis ASTROZA
CHI
23.11.1976
Assistant 2
Sergio ROMÁN
CHI
11.02.1969
Referee
Wilmar ROLDÁN
COL
24.01.1980
Assistant 1
Humberto CLAVIJO
COL
18.08.1973
Assistant 2
Eduardo DIAZ
COL
10.07.1973
Referee
Carlos VERA
ECU
25.06.1976
Assistant 1
Christian LESCANO
ECU
07.06.1983
Assistant 2
Byron ROMERO
ECU
12.07.1980
Referee
Antonio ARIAS
PAR
07.09.1972
Assistant 1
Rodney AQUINO
PAR
16.04.1984
Assistant 2
Carlos CACÈRES
PAR
26.06.1983




Referee
Víctor CARRILLO
PER
30.10.1975
Assistant 1
Jonny BOSSIO
PER
31.07.1975
Assistant 2
César ESCANO
PER
08.02.1970

67 Comments:

  1. Osses, Roldan and Vera should go for sure. However, Orosco and Soto had some good cames at the Copa '11 and I also would consider Arias.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous5/1/14 19:26

    I think AR Roman earned his spot in Osses's trio in the same way that Lupp did in Brych's trio.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right, fact is Roman was appointed with Osses in all his games in Conmebol after the injury of Mondria...

      Delete
    2. Anonymous5/1/14 19:34

      Mondria still paying the mistake at CWC a few years ago?

      Delete
    3. Don't think so, he had many games with Osses in 2012 (CWC mistake was 2011) and even was appointed for the Confederations Cup, but he got injured just before the tournament started...

      Delete
    4. Thank you, I have adapted the grid accordingly.

      Delete
    5. Anonymous5/1/14 19:38

      Carlos, you and Maicon have the best sources at FIFA. Could you find out whether 33 is the correct number and, if yes, which confederation gets 3+1 referees?

      Delete
    6. There is no official decision about it, but as far as I am informed 33 is the optimum, but there will be some discussion about it the 14th in the meeting. If there are 33 the extra place will go for "the best one of them"

      Delete
    7. Anonymous5/1/14 22:17

      What do you know about OFC: will they have 1+1, 1 or 0 referees at WC?

      Delete
    8. There will be at least one of them, I knew Busacca was considering 1+0 or 1+1

      Delete
    9. Anonymous5/1/14 22:54

      In that case, we will have: UEFA 10+1, CONMEBOL 6+1, AFC 4+1, OFC 1+0 and the question for me is whether CAF or CONCACAF will get 4+1 vs 3+1. What do you know? What do you think?

      Delete
    10. Anonymous6/1/14 12:42

      One referee spot for OFC is more than generous, in particular after Australia moved in AFC. To be fair, OFC should have zero main referee and one reserve referee, ie, 0+1.

      Delete
    11. Anonymous6/1/14 12:56

      Fully agree with the comment above. One spot as fourth official is more than enough. At least based on merit.

      /Swedish observer

      Delete
  3. As always, very interesting to read your detailed analysis, Niclas.
    I'm not so much expert about CONMEBOL, nevertheless I will try to have my say.
    First of all, we can't omit to underline the radical change in South American Elite refereeing after 2010 WC. Almost all the names are out. Baldassi, Larrionda, Simon, Pozo and so on. About Pozo it would be interesting to know something more about his early retirement after the last WC.
    Personal reasons, work, or still problems with his injury?

    So, now we have many new names. I will start, as you did, with the referees which I consider already at WC. First of all, Ricci and his impressive 2013. He has surely gained a spot. Heber Lopes, the other Brazilian, will be surely out, even though more experienced at high level.
    Then, I'm also sure about Pitana. Argentina can't remain without referees at WC and Pitana showed good performances in his U17 WC.
    Nevertheless, and I again agree with you, one might have expected strong and safe names from these two countries, starting from a few years ago.
    Both Ricci and Pitana are replacements of the last times.
    Of course, I also share your view about Abal: no chance.
    Even worse it's the situation in Uruguay. My feeling is that Vazquez will appear again as fourth official, and not as main referee.
    Then, another sure name it's Roldan from Colombia. No need to add further remarks, he showed to be reliable even though still quite young.
    To follow: Osses. He should be another quite sure official for WC, even though I was never really impressed by him. But this is clear that he has more hopes than the remaining names.
    Carlos Vera: I watched him in a match at U20 WC and he was good. I think he will be included in the final list as main referee.
    Arias: if you ask me, very difficult situation to read for this referee. I don't know him too much, he had some good appearances at FIFA tournaments, so I guess he is still in the fight for a spot. H
    The same count could be made for Carrillo, he can still keep the hope, but I don't know if there will be room. I would preferer Arias, merely based on the few matches I saw.
    Totally out according to my opinion: Orosco and especially Soto.
    So, considering a 6+1, my final choice is:
    1) Roldan
    2) Pitana
    3) Ricci
    4) Vera
    5) Osses
    6) Arias
    7) Vazquez (reserve)


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. About Pozo:
      You should consider he came into WC as 2nd option after Amarilla's assistant failure.
      Pozo was never a great ref and never in the top 5 of Conmebol, if you are his best Conmebol match was a Libertadores semifinal and that was all.
      Furthermore Osses was already coming in a strong shape, taking charge of a Libertadores semifinal just a year after Pozo and with far less experience, so that Pozo decided to retire after the World Cup since he considered he was retiring on the high-light of his referee career. Now he is Chile's ref coordinator :-)

      Delete
    2. Thanks Carlos.
      I must be honest, Pozo seemed to me a very good referee. Better than Osses, so for this reason I was quite surprised.
      He seemed a CONMEBOL big name, but now I learn, thank to you, that he wasn't.

      Delete
    3. It curious, if you remember we must consider Chandia was Chile's Golden Boy in that generation, but unfortunately he was a year too old for South Africa World Cup so that they had to push Pozo (who was in the FIFA list already in 1999, but only got something really important after 2008) to cover that place. Just consider Chandia was FIFA ref in 2001 against the 1999 of Pozo, and even so they did not pushed Pablo until 2008.

      Delete
  4. Anonymous5/1/14 22:07

    For me, Roldan, and possibly also Ricci are safe bets for the World cup. Presumably also Osses. I am not so sure about the rest.

    PS. I think that Ricci is born in 1974 and not 1970? DS.

    /Swedish observer

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous5/1/14 22:26

      I also thought that Ricci was born in 1974. On the other hand, I believe that Argentina must have a ref at WC. I do not recall any WC in modern times without a referee from Brazil, Argentina,, Italy, Spain, Germany or England. These countries are a must for World Cup, since they represent the best football.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous6/1/14 01:02

      @Swedish Observer: is Frisk involved in Swedish/European refereeing in any way?

      Delete
    3. Anonymous6/1/14 11:01

      Not to my knowledge. He was a mentor for UEFA a couple of years after retiring, but I don't think that he still is. He has never been involved in Swedish refereeing. Rumours say that he and Swedish referee committe boss Bo Karlsson (also in the UEFA referee committee) did not get along very well, but to be honest I have no idea whether that rumour is true.

      /Swedish observer

      Delete
  5. Thanks, changed.

    Rizzoli just had three magic minutes in Serie A (Juventus-AS Roma).
    He sent off two Roma players with direct red cards. The first for a serious scissors tackle when the ball was already away. Later on, correct penalty for handball on the goalline and red card. Both probably confirmed by AAR2. Excellent. The same Rizzoli in CL please...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, and in both cases I think that AAR2 Andrea De Marco was involved.
      In the case of the first red card, Rizzoli clearly talked in his earphones, in the second case the whistle came a bit later and it also seemed a decision suggested by De Marco, who surely was in a better position. The handball on the line at the replay was clear, but there were several players including the keeper and so a confusion was possible, since Rizzoli was not close.
      Excellent!
      I can add a faultless performance by both assistant referees and a correctly rejected penalty appeal for handball in first half.
      Very high mark for the whole crew, also the fourth official Manganelli who often calmed down coaches.

      Delete
    2. I agree, great decisions taken. I think however that the penalty/RC decision was taken by Rizzoli himself. De Marco's view was obstructed by a Juve player right in front of him. Very well seen by Rizzoli!

      Delete
  6. Chefren: how are the AAR's doing in Italy? Is it going well? Or, is it just like in the CL: hot/cold?
    In England, we have adopted goal-line technology and it is going very well (so far). Finally, do you see the Serie A utilising AAR's in the long term, or do you think eventually, you will adopt goal-line technology aswell?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous6/1/14 01:05

      Although the question was for Chefren, I think that Italy will use AAR as long as Collina uses them at UEFA. I am curious what will Germany and Spain do?

      Delete
    2. Fandel has made more than once clear that there won't be AARs in Germany. They are also quite unpopular among German officials. DFL is wondering about introducing GLT for quite a long time now, but it seems as if there won't be any means to avoid ghost goals in the foreseeable seasons.

      Delete
    3. Hi Nur,
      well I think that it is difficult to answer. One can say that the experiment is going well, if we consider several cases happened in these two years, anyway of course there were many other situations in which AARs might have helped the referees but they were unable to do that. I think that they are not evaluating the presence of AARs as positive or negative, they just appoint them to offer a further help to referees in certain situations.
      I must anyway also admit that starting from the first match with AARS at the beginning of the last season (2012-13) there were not missed ghost goal. Few cases happened and the AAR took always the correct decisions. I also think that for now there aren't reasons to remove them, and probably they will stay for many and many years in our serie A, at least as long as they will appear in UEFA competitions.

      Delete
    4. Of course, you surely remember Muntari ghost goal in Milan-Juventus 2011-12. Well, this is probably another reason for which AIA decided to introduce the AARs in our system.
      And if you ask me, it is better to have AAR even though not challenged most of the time, than to have certain blatant mistakes.

      Delete
    5. Thanks Chefren.
      Goal-line technology has been a success thus far on these shores and ideally, I would like it to be introduced to UEFA's club competitions in the near future.
      It is quite simple, there are cameras inserted into the goal-posts and on the roofs of the stadiums, and when the ball (fully) crosses the line, the referee is notified via this wrist watch they are wearing. It either says "GOAL" or "NO GOAL". We (the viewers) also get a nice graphic as well to show if the ball crosses the line or not. I personally believe this is the best method going forward. Even though AAR's are intensely trained, human error is still possibe and will happen occasionally, thus GLT (in my opinion) should be adopted by all major leagues and of course, the CL and EL.

      Delete
    6. Let's not forget the AAR's are not only there to judge GOAL/NO GOAL situations.

      Delete
    7. Yes, of course. ;)

      Delete
  7. By the way, Valentin Ivanov has been appointed by the Russian federation to head their referee department in future, after Rosetti had resigned for personal reasons last year.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Anonymous7/1/14 17:09

    Webb selected as World referee
    Second Place rizzoli
    Third kassai

    Best regards
    Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What do you mean?

      Delete
    2. Perhaps it is the ranking of IFFHS.

      Delete
    3. Correct, Edward, thank you.

      http://www.iffhs.de/the-worlds-best-referee/


      Kuipers at sixth place, Eriksson totally out.
      May I laugh?

      Delete
    4. I am already laughing Chefren.

      9/10 referees from Europe and only Irmatov in 8th place.

      Delete
    5. They know only Irmatov outside Europe :)

      Delete
    6. Bewildering...
      How have the come to this conclusion?

      Delete
    7. I tend to believe that.

      Delete
    8. Well Nur, if you want my opinion on that, it is simply said: they vote without taking any look at all the performance shown by each referee. Most of the time, the winner is always the referee who officiated the CL final. In this year it didn't happen. So, we read Webb. They anyway show to "know" only European football, since it is impossible to read only the name of Irmatov outside Europe. This year Irmatov had probably his worst performance ever.
      So, this ranking it's absolutely not reliable and it is just published as habit by IFFHS.

      Delete
    9. In that case, IFFHS has lost all its credibility.

      Delete
    10. Hopefully everyone can now understand why we decided to make our rankings again this year. But we should not take them too seriously.

      Delete
    11. Anonymous7/1/14 18:35

      Indeed!

      /Swedish observer

      Delete
    12. IFFHS should keep on doing what they are good at: keeping a record of world football, not ranking the referees.

      Delete
    13. At least the Brazilian federation has chosen the "correct" ranking. :) Enough narcism for today :D

      http://www.cbf.com.br

      Delete
    14. Anonymous7/1/14 21:17

      Nice! ;D

      Congratulations!

      /Swedish observer

      Delete
    15. Anonymous7/1/14 22:55

      Excellent!

      Delete
    16. International recognition for this wonderful blog.

      Delete
    17. Go home IFFHS. You're drunk...

      Kassai on three? Rizzoli on two? Cakir before Kuipers? Rocchi? This election was only about names, not about performance...

      (It has not to be pointed out, that "our" ranking ist much better...)

      Delete
    18. Congratulation for the recognition of brasilian federation to your (how can say our ?) blog ? GREAT !
      IFFHS this year completely wrong, but it should be first time, generally they match real ranking. I agree on Chefren's analysis: winner sometimes is who grant CL final without any deep competence as by people who fill this blog. Unacceptable that the only no european is Irmatov. No way to put Kuipers at 6th place.
      Rgs Mario

      Delete
    19. Anonymous8/1/14 22:35

      I think that is not serious say that Webb,Rizzoli and Kassai are the
      best referees of UEFA.

      Delete
  9. Anonymous8/1/14 13:50

    Assuming there is not much to say about OFC, now it is time for the analysis of the UEFA candidates for WC, with less than a week left before the official FIFA selection.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is sth to say about OFC, but surely not much :)
      Expect the posts at the weekend. There is more statistical background needed than for other confederations. Among others, the FIFA Referee Observers of the World Cup qualifiers will be published and integrated into the analysis, so it takes a bit more time than before.

      Delete
  10. Anonymous8/1/14 17:54

    Assuming 10 + 1 for UEFA, please find below my prediction. Difficult choices and maybe I am naive not nominating any Spaniard, but based on merit they don't qualify in my view. Lannoy is experienced and could be seen as a political choice, but he is a really good referee at his best. So is Mazic too, but he is too inexperienced for me in a World cup. As a reward for his rapid progress I think he would be appointed as a fourth official. Moen's time will come, but not now. Clattenburg, Thomson, Rocchi and Stark are simply not good enough this time (even though they of course are good officials). The other referees stand out and "shines" to me - and therefore I think that they have proven themselves to be worthy of a World cup nomination.

    /Swedish observer

    Brych, GER
    Cakir, TUR
    Eriksson, SWE
    Kassai, HUN
    Kuipers, NED
    Lannoy, FRA
    Proenca, POR
    Rizzoli, ITA
    Skomina, SVN
    Webb, ENG

    Mazic, SRB (reserve)







    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We only have 2 different names. So we mostly agree.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous8/1/14 19:43

      Let me guess that a Spaniard goes in and a Frenchman out...?

      /Swedish observer

      Delete
    3. Anonymous8/1/14 19:47

      Hopefully the Swede stays anyway :-)

      /Swedish observer

      Delete
    4. I largely agree with your compiled list too. Udiano for Monsieur Lannoy and Moen for Mazic
      Felix Brych (GER)
      Cüneyt Çakır (TUR)
      Jonas Eriksson (SWE)
      Viktor Kassai (HUN)
      Björn Kuipers (NED)
      Pedro Proença (POR)
      Nicola Rizzoli (ITA)
      Damir Skomina (SVN)
      Alberto Undiano Mallenco (ESP)
      Howard Webb (ENG)
      Svein Oddvar Moen (NOR) [Reserve]

      Delete
  11. FIFA referee commettee has scheduled a meeting in Zurich next week to define and to fill up the list of the trios appointed for FWC brasil. In 1 week it will be published. Regards

    ReplyDelete
  12. Do you think it's truth?
    http://futbol.as.com/futbol/2014/01/07/primera/1389065730_361594.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is impossible. UEFA can't give instructions without a real change od the LotG.

      Delete
  13. Friedrich8/1/14 22:39

    Sincerely I imagine that today the referees of the COMMEBOL have not one great quality, except Ricci and Roldán.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Anonymous12/1/14 22:02

    Useful predictions here. I suggest them to people who don't know who to guess in the competition on my blog

    ReplyDelete
  15. Anonymous12/1/14 22:03

    Strange. Can't publish comment with my name, only anonymous. Name is Jan and competition is on http://www.dutchreferee.com/predict-2014-world-cup-referees/

    ReplyDelete

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