June 25, 2014

Video Training: Assessing the Level of Punishment - Serious Foul Play 1


The so far most controversial sending-off has definitely been issued in yesterday's Group D tie between Italy and Uruguay when Italian Marchisio was given his marching orders by Mexican match official Marco Rodríguez.

This match situation will be the starting shot for our video coaching section that will be strengthened and intensified in future to enhance the educational part of the blog for the benefit of referees active at all levels. Our interpretations will be always based on the guidelines given by FIFA and UEFA accessible through their virtually available Referee Assistance Programs.
Normally, you will have the opportunity to discuss the situation and answer a poll before the presentation of our solution. This time, we are directly giving our interpretation, as this match situation was already a main subject in yesterday's discussions.



Laws of the Game, p.126 in short:
"A player is guilty of serious foul play if he uses excessive force or brutality against an opponent when challenging for the ball when it is in play. A player who is guilty of serious foul play should be sent off."

Interpretation:
Blue #8 challenges his opponent White #17 and makes unfair contact with his leg with his studs shown. There is not any intent or chance to play the ball. The intensity of the challenge is not extremely high and there are no particular signs of high brutality, but nonetheless the tackle clearly endangers the safety of the opponent in a significant way. If the referee deems this as excessive force, he has to sent off the player with a red card.
However, referees are officially reminded to integrate the spirit of the game into their judgment so that there is some scope for interpretation making a yellow card acceptable under special circumstances (i.e., if the spirit of the game is normal as an example).
Though, we strongly welcome the decision taken by the referee to send off Blue #8 given the danger arousing from this type of tackles. Correct Red Card.

Referees should also be reminded on always striving for the best visual angle achieved by flexibly and anticipatively positioning and moving on the field of play. Marco Rodríguez was very close, actually too close, to perfectly identify the tackle and gauge the adequate disciplinary sanction. More distance is required to savour the best visual (sidewise) position possible.

Furthermore we would like to stress that both more determination and a stronger reaction to protests are definitely needed. There is no reason for the goalkeeper to leave his penalty area by 70 metres - not even being the team's captain - except if his intention is to calm down his teammates. What Buffon did was complaining only though.

The video is property of FIFA and is embedded from vimeo and not uploaded on this blog. It is used for educational purpose only and is not subject to any commercial use.

15 Comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sorry, but you are really mixing things and definitions up here. What happens between the players is per definition a challenge - a challenge for the ball. It is a complete misinterpretation if you think that you have to consider who controlled the ball in this context. Following your argumentation, a player who "controls" the ball is hence given a "free pass" for any serious foul play committed by him? Say that the person who controls the ball gives a stud up tackle to an opponent trying to gain possession of the ball. By following your argumentation you cannot give him a RC. See the problem with you misinterpretation here?

      Further disproving the RC by saying that the player, who the offence was committed against, was running into the path of the offender and never controlled the ball, is nowhere mentioned as en eligible excuse in the LoTG to commit a tackle with excessive force or brutality against an opponent (further defined as serious foul play), which is explained in the article above.

      Delete
  2. Here is an excellent 1080p video link. Apparently, a different video feed.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkU30HlkNU4&feature=player_detailpage

    I deleted my dissenting opinion upon watching this version. A very bold and correct RC decision by the referee.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As long as we can agree on that the definition of serious foul play:

      "A player is guilty of serious foul play if he uses excessive force or brutality against an opponent when challenging for the ball when it is in play."

      is NOT to be interpreted as if a player who "controls" the ball cannot commit serious foul play, in the belief that "he cannot challenge for a ball that he already controls" - and the definition of serious foul play then do not apply to him. Because this is wrong.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Being the capitain does not entitle a player to challenge the referee's decisions in an unsporting manner. According to the laws of the game, "The captain of a team has no special status or privileges under the Laws of the Game but he has a degree of responsibility for the behaviour of his team." (LotG 2013-14, p. 126). I can recall in particular the final of the EURO 2008, where Roberto Rosetti cautioned Iker Casillas for leaving his net to challenge Rosetti. In the film "Kill the Referee", Manuel Mejuto Gonzalez mentions that referees at that tournament were instructed to be strict on goaltenders leaving their post to voice dissent. We can assume similar guidelines are in place.

      Delete
    2. There is no reason for the goalkeeper to leave his penalty area by 70 metres - not even being the team's captain.

      = even if you are the captain, you have no right to leave the penalty area and confront the referee like Buffon did.

      Delete
  4. @Niclas Maybe you can send me the test again, because I didn't found it in my mails

    ReplyDelete
  5. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Well, ok, the wording is maybe not the best. I related this to Buffon protesting against the decision. Calming his teammates down is ok given common sense in my opinion. Good point.

    ReplyDelete
  7. OT: It seems as if Luis Suarez has been banned for 9 matches.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed, and a four month general ban as well.

      Delete
    2. And for four months from any football-related activities. First game back will be in Nov 1st. Well, that ends Liverpool's title hopes ;)

      Delete
  8. Italian player here directly directory kicking opponent's net exported in the form.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The ball does not come for intervention, direct competitor for mutilation is kicking string, and exported in the form.

    ReplyDelete

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