July 6, 2016

Refereeing Analysis for the Quarterfinals 2-4 (Skomina WAL-BEL, Kassai GER-ITA, Kuipers FRA-ISL)

Our analyses for the last three quarterfinals officiated by Damir Skomina, Viktor Kassai and Björn Kuipers. Felix Brych's performance has already been analyzed here.


Team Skomina in Wales vs Belgium

Damir Skomina confirmed the overall good level of refereeing he had already brought onto the turf in his three previous games. His decision-taking was widely confident and, most important, he kept the match under full control.

The probably most interesting facet of his performance was his relatively humorless dealing with tactical fouls (VIDEO). I deliberately use the term "tactical" here as all three cases where he brandished early yellow cards were indeed "tactical" offences which are mostly mentioned in one row with a yellow card given by a referee.

The Laws of the Game however focus on "breaking up" or, in UEFA terminology, "stopping promising attacks". In 5', the referee actually well detected that this was more than a "normal foul". Indeed Wales stopped a first attacking movement of the Belgian side. But was it promising? Rather no. Too many other defenders waiting for the player fouled, not 100% clear whether he would be there without being fouled.

Issuing a yellow card for that after only 5 minutes has many consequences:

1) You send a clear signal that this conduct won't be accepted in the game.

2) You have decided to early leave a stepwise approach and immediately position kind of roadblock in the match - with the consequence that you have less degrees of freedom and fewer opportunities in coming situations (harder offences or more blatant cases of SPAs cannot be managed with a warning).

3) Players and team officials expect consistency. You must finish what you start. Comparable incidents have to be yellow-carded then, too, in future.

Maybe it was part of the pre-match-discussion or even a special finding discussed with the match analyst that it might be useful to quickly take "tactical" fouls out of the game. If that's the case, the decision in 5' is all right.

The good thing is that Skomina stayed consistent in this regard. Comparable tactical fouls and a stonewall case of SPA were sanctioned with a yellow card later in 16' and 24'.

However, a match which was very calm in terms of the game-temperature and conflict-level actually does not need three yellow cards after only 24 minutes. If there are offences that simply demand a yellow card, it is a different story, of course. For my taste, a public warning in 5' would have been the better and maybe more pro-active solution - on the other hand, the circumstance that Wales went on making tactical fouls actually justifies Skomina's approach: They continued even after they had been cautioned early. What would have they done if he had not given yellow in 5'?...

Most important: If the same team get into your book three times after only 24 minutes for partly no 100% clear yellow card offences, you should at least ensure a certain balance. What Hazard did in 25' should have resulted in a yellow card for 1) SPA (Wales would have started a quick counterattack - maybe - and specially for delaying the re-start of play by throwing the ball away in a quite blatant manner. A pedagogic warning as done by Skomina - which looked like he was showing a small pupil the way to his school - is not enough here.

Did a really good job in France: Team Skomina


Two crucial situations were - technically considered - incorrectly taken later on (click on the minutes to watch videos).

79': Already cautioned WAL #4 carelessly trips BEL #9 who dynamically enters the penalty area. The referee's view is maybe a bit blocked (I cannot really blame him for a lack of anticipation). While #9 at first slightly moves his foot to the back, the defender's foot clearly goes out - the ball is far away, so what is his foot doing there save deliberately stopping his opponent? A missed foul, and therefore also a missed 2nd yellow card - which is technically a crucial mistake. But the situation was forgotten by most players some seconds later, the protests were limited. Furthermore it might have looked completely different for Skomina than in the replay - so... acceptable call in game-reality.

82': WAL #6 clearly steps on BEL #4's foot. Normally such tackles are deemed as reckless in UEFA's referee assistance programs. However, this one is very light and therefore only careless. For me, this should have been a penalty kick on a technical side. Maybe the practical side looks a bit different as Skomina's view was surely not the best one - his delayed step towards the action looked a bit alibi-like in this situation - he was too far away. The key point for improvement is to be a bit more active and anticipative in terms of positioning and "angle-seeking". Always create the best visual angle possible.

All in all, the performance was OK in the big picture. No complaints or protests after the game. In this regard and in a bigger, tournament-based image, the Slovenian team can be very content about their last match. At a technical level, there were clear rooms for improvement.

Our Observers' Mark Proposals



Ø
Artur (SUI)
Carter (AUS)
Chefren (ITA)
Detelin (BUL)
Edward (GRE)
Harry
(ENG)
Niclas
(GER)
RayHD (POL)
Rik (NED)
Maxi (GER)
Ref: Skomina
7.98
8.3
n.a.
7.9
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
7.9
7.8
n.a.
n.a.
AR1: Praprotnik
8.47


8.5

8.5 8.4

AR2: Vukan
8.27


8.3


8.3
8.2

AAR1: Jug
8.40


8.4

8.4 8.4

AAR2: Vinčić
8.43


8.4


8.4
8.5

4OF: Rizzoli
8.40


8.4


8.4
8.4












TEAM AVERAGE
8.19


* Team Average: Referee's Average Mark 50% + Marks of AR1, AR2, AAR1 and AAR2 50%
** The highest and lowest average marks are eliminated to control deviations (statistical reasons), but only if 5 or more observers have submitted their marks.


Team Kassai in Germany vs Italy

Viktor Kassai's third match was definitely his best at this tournament. Full control, much empathy, sportsmanship and an excellent fitness during 120 minutes + penalty shoot-out. In fact, he ran more than some of the players - and looked less exhausted in the end. 


There were some situations to analyze though.  This will happen, but in terms of future educational posts. And the penalty was very clear - so there is little added value to concentrate on it.

What I'd like to focus on is Germany's 1:0 goal. Many people said that it had resulted from an offside position of Mario Gómez. That's right: His left foot was offside - the rest wasn't. Furthermore, the ball came from Neuer (60m away). So: Assistant Referee Tóth - who was great apart from that - must be supported, absolutely understandable to let the flag down.



What was strange was Kassai's coin-toss before the penalty shoot-out. Actually, the referee is the one which side of the coin stands for what goal. He allowed Schweinsteiger to take that decision... his reaction to the German captain choosing the Italian fan curve was however fantastic (sth like "Youuuuu really want to go there??") - his mimic showed that even after 120 minutes he was still fully "in the game" and on one level with the players.


On the whole, a great and emotional match with an overall very good referee team (highest mark average so far).

Our Observers' Mark Proposals


Ø
Artur (SUI)
Carter (AUS)
Chefren (ITA)
Detelin (BUL)
Edward (GRE)
Harry
(ENG)
Niclas
(GER)
RayHD (POL)
Rik (NED)
Maxi (GER)
Ref: Kassai
8.54
n.a.
8.6
8.5
8.5
8.5
n.a.
8.6
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
AR1: Ring
8.30


8.3

8.3

AR2: Tóth
8.60


8.6


8.6

AAR1: Bognar
8.50


8.5

8.5

AAR2: Farkas
8.40


8.4


8.4

4OF: Marciniak
8.40


8.4


8.4












TEAM AVERAGE
8.50


* Team Average: Referee's Average Mark 50% + Marks of AR1, AR2, AAR1 and AAR2 50%


Team Kuipers in France vs Iceland

Björn Kuipers was the maybe most unlucky match official in the quarterfinals. A match which is decided after 20 minutes is no ideal opportunity to show your class. He had less opportunities to shine compared to Kassai and co. 


Nonetheless, his performance was absolutely good. He nicely developed a stepwise disciplinary approach using effective verbal warnings in 9' and 18' (1 against each team) and used the best possible and very needed option to issue the first yellow card.

Additionally, two game-relevant decisions were correctly taken: The 1-0 was no offside and the handball by Evra was surely undeliberate.



Arguments in favour of an undeliberate handball:

The ball came totally unexpected. And from a very small distance. The arm was not stiff, but retreated after the contact with the ball. It was a normal, natural and player-typical hand position in this concrete defending movement. Evra never intended to play the ball with his hand in this moment - neither in the sense of the word, nor in the sense of the Laws of the Game.

Arguments in favour of a deliberate handball:

none (for me)

Our Observers' Mark Proposals


Ø
Artur (SUI)
Carter (AUS)
Chefren (ITA)
Detelin (BUL)
Edward (GRE)
Harry
(ENG)
Niclas
(GER)
RayHD (POL)
Rik (NED)
Maxi (GER)
Ref: Kuipers
8.40
8.4
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
8.4
8.4
8.4
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
AR1: van Roekel
8.40
8.4

8.3

8.5

AR2: Zeinstra
8.37
8.4

8.3
8.4

AAR1: van Boekel
8.43
8.4


8.4

8.5

AAR2: Liesveld
8.40
8.4

8.4
8.4

4OF: Mazic
8.40
8.4

8.4
8.4












TEAM AVERAGE
8.40


* Team Average: Referee's Average Mark 50% + Marks of AR1, AR2, AAR1 and AAR2 50%

2 Comments:

  1. Great analysis.

    Skomina: I'm guessing the team was expecting the Welch to do everything possible to hamper the highly favoured Belgians. All 3 early Cautions were deliberate breeches of the LOTG to slow down the Belgians. Hazard committed an offence against the referee, not opponents (different). Personality/warning acceptable. 79' -- in real time, would have been tricky to see if attacker went into defender's foot as defender's foot came down naturally or if defender deliberately extended foot in front of attacker. Acceptable play on. 82' player who had foot stepped in PA had flopped a bit easily several times earlier in match. This raises doubt level, especially in PA. Not a crucial mistake -- referee is entitled to opinion that it's not enough for a foul.

    Kassai: Wholly agree on analysis including the "offside". Coin toss was interesting. LOTG simply say coin toss decides. Choosing one of captains to do could be potentially controversial. :)

    Kuipers: This not deliberate handling decision is one that MUST show up on educational videos for ALL referees. Too many in my neck of the woods still call every ball to hand. Then Ref Al shows up -- play continues and players do appreciate it. :)

    ReplyDelete

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